top of page

Dying may be an experience of peace and awakening


Dying may be an experience of peace and awakening.
Dying may be an experience of peace and awakening.




The innate human yearning for immortality reflects our deep-seated fear of death and the unknown and a desire to prolong experiences, relationships, and consciousness. This existential drive has fueled countless quests for the elixir of life, advancements in medical science, and the exploration of spiritual practices aimed at transcending the physical limits of the human body.

Fear of the unknown
Fear of the unknown

Contrasting this desire, the reality of death is universally acknowledged as inevitable. The philosophical inquiry raises a poignant critique of nature's design—if death is a certainty, why is it often perceived as a negative, painful, and chaotic end? This perception might stem from our natural aversion to loss and the unknown, coupled with the societal narratives surrounding death.

However, many individuals experience death in a state of peace and well-being. Countless anecdotal and documented instances of people approaching their final moments with a serene acceptance or sudden surge of vitality and peace. This phenomenon, where the dying appears to be in a state of grace or enlightenment, challenges the conventional fear and negativity associated with death.



actual death may not be as chaotic and painful as we think
Actual death may not be as chaotic and painful as we think

However, recent scientific studies indicate that the actual death may not be as chaotic and painful as we think. The presence of high-frequency Gamma waves in the dying brain suggests a possible neurophysiological basis for the profound peace and clarity reported in near-death experiences and observed in the dying. High-frequency Gamma waves are recorded in the brain of meditation masters, associated with heightened awareness, focus, and a sense of bliss. This raises the possibility that dying could induce a state of consciousness like profound meditative states characterized by coherence, clarity, and peace.


This finding aligns with various spiritual and philosophical traditions that view death not as an end but as a transition to a different state of being or consciousness. It also resonates with the concept of "conscious dying" in contemporary spiritual practices, where the death process is approached with awareness and acceptance, often leading to profound personal and spiritual insights.


Death could also be a moment of deep spiritual significance and transformation
Death could also be a moment of deep spiritual significance and transformation

In contemplating death from this perspective, the narrative invites a re-evaluation of our attitudes toward dying. Rather than viewing it solely as a moment of loss and despair, it suggests that death could also be a moment of deep spiritual significance and transformation, offering a final, profound insight into the nature of consciousness and the human experience. This view doesn't negate the sorrow of loss but proposes a broader, more nuanced understanding of death's place in the human journey.



Click the following link for more details about the research study.



More Articles from Jivasu.org:


Soma with Jivasu- Path of the Body


The revolutionary Soma approach facilitates the awakening the body’s wisdom for complete health and self-realization. Based on science, it is not metaphysical or mystical, but natural and biological. Soma programs connect us to our bodies, and unblock our life energy leading to healing, health and fulfilment

The Soma approach was founded by Dr. Jivasu, a paediatrician and renowned spiritual teacher. We offer online courses and workshops. Click here to see our current offerings.

Comments


bottom of page